Calvert Co. Public Schools News Briefs - Southern Maryland Headline News

Calvert Co. Public Schools News Briefs


Joint Press Release of Calvert County Public Schools and the Calvert Association of Supervisors and Administrators

The Board of Education of Calvert County Public Schools and the Calvert Association of Supervisors and Administrators have reached tentative agreement on eight articles of a new successor agreement for the FY16 employment contract. The two parties exchanged initial proposals on March 10 and began negotiations on March 31.

The parties are scheduled to meet and discuss remaining open articles at the next negotiations session on April 16, 2015.

Joint Press Release Calvert County Public Schools and the Calvert Association of Educational Support Staff

The Board of Education of Calvert County Public Schools and the Calvert Association of Educational Support Staff (CAESS) reached a tentative agreement for the FY15 employment contract.

Under the tentative agreement reached on April 13, 2015, support staff employees will receive a 1% cost of living adjustment to be prorated to an equivalent value of 0.5% increase that will be distributed as a single payment no later than June 30, 2015. Employees who were at step 17 in FY14 will receive a 1% pensionable salary adjustment to be incorporated into the base salary and will be distributed as a single payment no later than June 30, 2015.

Other topics addressed in the tentative agreement include payroll schedule and a fair share representation fee.

CAESS and the Board of Education must now ratify the tentative agreement.

2015 Teacher of the Year and Educational Support Person of the Year

Calvert County Public Schools (CCPS) proudly announces the 2015 Teacher of the Year and Educational Support Person of the Year. Robert F. James, social studies teacher at Huntingtown High School, is the Teacher of the Year. Sharon T. Kruder, instructional assistant in the library media center at Calvert High School, is the Educational Support Person of the Year.

This year marks the 29th Teacher of the Year celebration and the 21st Educational Support Person of the Year recognition. The honorees are first chosen to represent their schools and then move on to the district-level event. As Teacher of the Year, Mr. James will participate in the state competition in the fall.

Patuxent High School and Northern High School Receive Project Lead the Way Certification

Patuxent High School and Northern High school have received national certification for their Project Lead the Way (PLTW) programs that they have offered since 2012. Patuxent High received certification for its Biomedical program, and Northern High received certification for both its Engineering and Biomedical programs.

PLTW, a nonprofit organization and the nation's leading provider of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education programs, offers a rigorous world-class curriculum that allows students to apply what they are learning in math and science class to real-life biomedical science activities, projects and problems. PLTW also provides high-quality professional development of its teachers and an engaged network of business, community and university partners to give students the fullest experience.

The national PLTW recognition program distinguishes schools for successfully demonstrating a commitment to PLTW's national standards. Additionally, certification as a PLTW school provides students with the opportunity to apply for college credit or receive college-level recognition at PLTW affiliate universities when they successfully complete select PLTW courses in high school. PLTW has more than 50 affiliate college, university and research partners.

In order to remain competitive in the global economy, America needs approximately 400,000 science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) college graduates annually, according to a National Business Roundtable report. Currently, the U.S. is graduating only 265,000 annually. PLTW is providing students with the skills, foundation and proven path to college and career success in STEM areas to increase the number of STEM graduates.

Michael Watson, principal of Patuxent High School said, "We've seen how the PLTW program draws more students into the biomedical sciences and gets them thinking about college and their careers. We are extremely proud to be PLTW certified and ecstatic that our students are eligible for college-level recognition, which may include college credit, scholarships and admissions preference."

Northern High principal Kevin Howard sees similar benefits for his students. "These programs," he said, "provide students with real-world opportunities that will prepare them for their future endeavors in

their selected fields. The teachers encourage students to explore all that the program has to offer. Students will truly be prepared for their post-secondary educational experiences."

As part of the recognition process, the school administrations; Mr. Mark Wilding, Career and Technology Education Supervisor; and a team composed of teachers, staff, students and members of the community submitted a self-assessment of the schools' implementation of the PLTW programs. A site visit by a PLTW trained team followed. PLTW's team met with teachers, school administrators, counselors, students and members of the school's Partnership Team. A PLTW school's Partnership Team is comprised of teachers, counselors, administrators, post-secondary representatives, business and industry professionals and other community members who actively support the PLTW program within a school.

Lorraine Dunigan, PLTW teacher at Patuxent High School added, "The beauty of PLTW courses is that our kids get to experience how a concept they learned in science applies to a real-world project. In class, there are very few lectures - students are exploring the concepts of human medicine, mapping and analyzing DNA, and designing innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century. That is the kind of hands-on experience that will engage more students in fields that they might otherwise never have considered."

Patuxent High Educator Named 2015 Winner of The Washington Post Outstanding Teacher Award

The Washington Post has named Scott Goldstein, a teacher at Patuxent High School (PHS) in Calvert County Public Schools as one of twenty recipients of the 2015 Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Awards. Winning educators were chosen by their school system for exemplifying excellence in teaching, fostering cooperative relationships with their colleagues and community and contributing in a substantive way to the improvement of education in the Washington area.

Michael Watson, principal of PHS, said, "I have known Mr. Goldstein from many points of view over the years, and no matter what lens I look at him through he is an amazing person, educator and community leader. I can personally attest to his tenacious work ethic, sincere concern for all learners, his work outside the classroom and in the community and the passion and energy that he brings to his job every single day."

Mr. Goldstein began teaching in Chicago before moving to Maryland and taking a teaching position with Prince George's County Public Schools. He moved to PHS in Calvert County in 1996, where he has taught general and Advanced Placement (AP) history, government, and criminal law, among other courses. He has also served as a football and basketball coach, sponsored the PHS Student Government and is the facilitator of the Calvert Association of Student Councils. Since 2001, Mr. Goldstein has served as an AP coordinator for PHS. He is a College Board exam reader and currently serves as a table leader for the AP summer scoring process. He has twice been chosen as Teacher of the Year for PHS, has won the Dana Kirkman Student Mentorship Award and the Rutgers University Honors Program Award.

Winners will be honored during an award ceremony at The Post on Tuesday, May 19 and receive a personalized trophy, a monetary award and mentions in The Washington Post Magazine and on The Post's website.

The Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Awards, formed in 1983, recognize pre-kindergarten-12 teachers who ensure students receive a high-quality education through first-class and creative instruction. The Post also named 20 recipients of the Distinguished Educational Leadership Awards, established in 1987 to honor principals who go beyond the daily responsibilities of their position to create an exceptional educational environment through dedicated leadership.

In presenting these awards, The Washington Post hopes to encourage excellence in school leadership and to contribute to the improvement of education in the Washington metropolitan area.

Dowell Elementary's Principal Jennifer Young Named 2015 Winner of The Washington Post Distinguished Educational Leadership Award

The Washington Post has named Jennifer Young, a principal at Dowell Elementary in Calvert County Public Schools as one of twenty recipients of the 2015 Distinguished Educational Leadership Award. The metro area educators recognized were chosen by their school systems for demonstrated leadership abilities and a commitment to creating an exceptional educational environment for students, faculty and staff, among many other attributes.

Assistant Superintendent of Operations Diane Workman praised Ms. Young for being a leader in the school system and among her colleagues, saying, "Ms. Young is not afraid to question practices and always makes decisions based on the needs of her students. Her humor and pleasant, respectful approach are invaluable as she leads and manages a busy, dynamic school."

After receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education from Salisbury State University in 1990, Ms. Young became a 4th and 5th grade science and language arts teacher. During that time, Ms. Young received her Master's Degree in curriculum and instruction from Western Maryland College. After becoming a vice principal in 2002, Ms. Young was soon promoted to principal of Dowell Elementary School and currently serves in that position. Ms. Young consistently explores new ideas with parents and colleagues and models professional growth by teaching, coaching and assisting others in professional development that focuses on student learning.

Winners will be honored during an award ceremony at The Post on Tuesday, May 5 and receive a personalized trophy, a monetary award and mentions in The Washington Post Magazine and on The Post's website.

The Distinguished Educational Leadership Awards were established in 1987 to honor principals who go beyond the daily responsibilities of their position to create an exceptional educational environment through dedicated leadership. The Post also named 20 recipients of the Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Awards, which were formed in 1983 to recognize pre-kindergarten-12 teachers who ensure students receive a high-quality education through first-class and creative instruction.

In presenting these awards, The Washington Post hopes to encourage excellence in school leadership and to contribute to the improvement of education in the Washington metropolitan area.

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