MDE Issues Water Management Enforcement Actions For Violations in So. Md. - Southern Maryland Headline News

MDE Issues Water Management Enforcement Actions For Violations in So. Md.


BALTIMORE (July 3, 2008) The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Water Management Administration Compliance Program issued the following enforcement actions against companies in southern Maryland between April 1 and June 30, 2008.

RIDGE VALLEY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY – St. Mary’s County—On May 19, 2008 a settlement agreement was executed for penalty settlement of $5,200 for Title 4 violations and $1,200 for Title 9 violations that occurred at the Hermanville Addition to Greenbriar, Lexington Park, St. Mary’s County. The company had failed to maintain and implement an erosion and sediment control plan.

Maryland Environment Law Title 4 requires that a Soil Conservation District must approve a sediment control plan for any proposed land clearing, soil movement, and construction prior to construction, and the approval must be maintained for the life of the project. It further provides that it is unlawful for any person to introduce soil or sediment into waters of the State or to place soil or sediment in a condition or location where it is likely to be washed into waters of the State. Sediment is considered a pollutant under this statute.

MIRANT MARYLAND ASH MANAGEMENT, LLC – Charles County On May 29, 2008, the Attorney General filed, on behalf of MDE, a civil Complaint for Injunctive Relief and Civil Penalties against Mirant Maryland Ash Management, LLC for alleged unlawful discharges of pollutants to waters of the State at Mirant’s Faulkner Fly Ash Disposal Facility located in Faulkner, Charles County. The order seeks civil penalties of up to $10,000 per day and remedial action to address groundwater contamination and violations of Maryland water quality standards in a tributary of Zekiah Swamp.

Maryland Law prohibits the discharge of any pollutant into waters of the State, including groundwater and surface waters, unless it is in accordance with a State Discharge Permit. This permit requires that permittees monitor wastewater discharges from their facilities and self report analytical data to MDE confirming compliance with established discharge effluent standards of the permit to demonstrate compliance with State water quality standards.

“Enforcing environmental laws is an important component of Maryland’s efforts to protect human health and the environment,” said MDE Secretary Shari T. Wilson. “We are indebted to our 132 inspectors who are responsible for enforcing Maryland’s environmental laws.”

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