Maryland Honors Ten St. Mary's County Public Schools - Southern Maryland Headline News

Maryland Honors Ten St. Mary's County Public Schools


LEONARDTOWN, Md. (Feb. 7, 2008) - The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) is recognizing 10 public schools in St. Mary's County for achievement on the 2007 Maryland School Assessment (MSA)/Maryland High School Assessments (HSA's) and for improvement among subgroups between the 2006 and 2007 test results.

The awards program, a requirement of the highly controversial federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), recognizes schools for the overall achievement of their students on the 2007 Maryland School Assessment and for improving the performance of special populations (subgroups) for two years. Special populations, identified under NCLB, include race/ethnicity, special education, limited English proficient, and those receiving free or reduced price meals.

Title I schools will each receive a modest financial award that can be used for activities and equipment to improve student performance, but cannot be used for staff bonuses or salaries. The School Improvement Team in each Title I school decides how the funds can best benefit students and instruction. All recognized schools will receive certificates of recognition for public display.

The following St. Mary's County Public Schools are recipients of this award:

-- Benjamin Banneker Elementary, Certificate, Overall Achievement & Subgroup Improvement
-- Dynard Elementary, Certificate, Subgroup Improvement
-- Green Holly Elementary: $5,757.52; Subgroup Improvement
-- Hollywood Elementary, Certificate, Overall Achievement
-- Lexington Park Elementary: $5,757.52; Subgroup Improvement
-- Oakville Elementary, Certificate, Overall Achievement
-- Piney Point Elementary, Certificate, Overall Achievement
-- Town Creek Elementary, Certificate, Overall Achievement
-- White Marsh Elementary, Certificate, Overall Achievement & Subgroup Improvement
-- Great Mills High School, Certificate, Subgroup Improvement

The Maryland School Performance Recognition Program was created by the Maryland General Assembly in 1996 as a way to recognize schools for their students' achievement on state tests. The program, which publicly recognizes the work of teachers, principals, parents, and community members in helping to improve student learning, was modified in 2003 to make it compatible with the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

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